RSS Feed

Fun, Travel and An Aftermath That’s Worth It

Hello everyone! It has been a wild ride the last couple weeks, a little bit of not so nice and a boatload of joy.

On June 9, I had a gallbladder attack! I would think it a weird thing for a vegetarian to have, but I did. I have a sludgy gallbladder. It was horrible, a fact anyone who has had one surely knows. I will be having my gallbladder out in the near future, rather than have that happen again. I seriously thought I was having a heart attack. Because of the FMS, it took  about days to fully recover. The way I had to position myself, breathe deeply into my side ribs and hold my breath several times during the ultrasound was a bit much for my body to take. But this is the worst thing to happen to me in years, and is forgettable in comparison to the trip we took on June 11.

On June 11, my husband and I took off to Kansas. We had quality time with his kids, all of whom I adore! If that wasn’t enough joy to fill my heart, seeing my stepdaughter get married and attending my grandson’s first birthday party was over the top! It was all so wonderful my heart cannot contain it all, and words cannot express just how wonderful it was. We also went to the Smoky Hill River Festival in Salina, Kansas, which was interesting and fun, full of art and music. In Kansas City, Missouri, we saw the King Tut exhibit at Union Station, another highlight of our trip.

All the family, fun and activity was great. I wouldn’t trade it for the world. But you know what can happen after travel, fun or excitement. I call it aftermath. You may know it simply as pain and fatigue flare. We got home late on Monday night. By Saturday I finally felt like the aftermath had subsided a little bit. What to do? It isn’t like you can completely avoid it rearing its ugly head, whether or not you choose to avoid travel and joy, which you wouldn’t want to do anyway.

So what can you do to help guard and prepare yourself? The biggest thing for me is planning, plenty of sleep, good nutrition, plenty of water and sticking to my exercise schedule. I wasn’t able to fully execute my plan beforehand, because of the visit to the emergency room, but I was still able to execute the other strategies. While I had to do both Monday’s and Tuesday’s tasks on Tuesday, at least I had a plan. It would have been worse had I not had a plan.

While we were on our trip, I was able to get seven or eight hours of sleep nearly every night. I drank plenty of water, and ate well, even though I indulged a bit in desserts. Oh the horror! LOL While my exercise schedule at home is different from what happened on our trip, I still got plenty of exercise. We did a great deal of walking, particularly at the Festival, where we went on two days. Since I’ve gotten home, I have done the same thing, gotten sleep, water and good food. Yesterday I got a little extra exercise while walking the dogs. We simply took a longer walk that we all enjoyed. The weather is so nice, taking a longer walk is a no-brainer.

The biggest thing about flares is to plan for them. They are inevitable. Think what you can do for yourself to work through them when you know a flare will likely happen. Sometimes by doing that, the flare isn’t as bad or may not happen at all! When you get one unexpectedly, it may be for no reason at all, or you may know why it happened. Try to learn from your flares. You can use that information to prevent and get through the flare next time. Above all, be patient. Do your best to keep a good attitude. Wallowing in your misery will make it worse. This leads me to an idea, the relationship between pain and emotion and attachment. Maybe we will talk about that next time. Hmmm.

A happy life is made of happy moments. Though there are moments which aren’t so happy, we have to have that contrast to know the difference. Concentrate on those happy moments and live a happy life. The flare will pass.

Cheers!

Julie

About Julie Hodges, RYT

I am a happily-married, 53-year-old woman living in a beautiful place with my husband and our three dogs/babies. I was diagnosed with Fibromyalgia (FMS) in 2004. While FMS affects every moment of my life, I have learned to live with it and be happy, not allowing it to destroy me. While I have FMS, it does NOT have ME! As a yoga and meditation teacher, and as a Reiki Master/Teacher, it is my passion to help people have a good, strong and healthy life and relationships. Fibromyalgia Lifeline will help me serve that passion. It is an honor to lead by example, as well as to continue to be a student on this path to freedom from the hold of FMS. Other than that, I like to knit, read, write, be outside, play with my dogs, be with family and friends, movies, some TV shows, ghosthunting, go places in our RV, travel, music, and so many other things, but mainly laugh and have a great time.

2 responses »

  1. George L Feriend Jr

    We had an amazing time. Julie is a very tough but compassionate person. Her pain never stopped her from enjoying every moment. That is why I say she is tough. Even I know she is in pain, it doesn’t keep her from making memories. I love you and thank you for being a wonderful companions and best friend.

    Like

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: